Broadmoor Baker’s Bread

Many moons ago, my Mom had a website (www.thebreadworks.com). Each month, she added a new recipe to the “Recipe of the Month” section. This recipe is the selection from January 2002 which is pretty much pre-Cambrian in terms of internet history.

Here’s the introduction my Mom wrote: “There’s a gentleman in Seattle who sells commercial real estate during the week. On weekends he delves deeply into his favorite hobby, baking bread. He became quite famous within his neighborhood of Broadmoor because of the wonderful smells coming from his home and his gifts of bread…

…He sold his favorite recipe to a commercial baker who now produces thousands of loaves a week of his Broadmoor Bread. He’s gone on to sell other recipes to the same baker, but his first loaf is still his best. Of course, the recipe is not given to anyone, but this is my version of his bread following the ingredients listed on the package.”

Broadmoor Baker's Bread

There's a gentleman in Seattle who sells commercial real estate during the week. On weekends he delves deeply into his favorite hobby, baking bread. He became quite famous within his neighborhood of Broadmoor because of the wonderful smells coming from his home and his gifts of bread.

Prep Time 1 hour 45 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 30 minutes
Servings 2 loaves
Author Betsy Oppenneer

Ingredients

  • 2 scant tablespoons (or 2 ¼-ounce packages) active dry yeast
  • cup warm water about 105 to 115 degrees
  • ¼ cup molasses
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 4 cups unbleached flour approximately
  • ½ cup sesame seeds
  • ½ cup hulled sunflower seeds
  • ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • ½ cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • ¼ cup cracked wheat
  • ¼ cup poppy seeds
  • ¼ cup pepitas
  • ¼ cup gluten flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • ¼ cup soy, safflower, or canola oil

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, stir the yeast into water to soften. 

  2. Add molasses, whole wheat flour, and 1 cup unbleached flour. Beat vigorously for 2 minutes. This is a sponge and has the consistency of a cake batter. Cover and let rise for one hour. It should be light and full of bubbles.

  3. Add sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, brown sugar, rolled oats, cracked wheat, poppy seeds, pumpkin seeds, gluten flour, salt, and oil to the sponge.
  4. Gradually add flour, ¼ cup at a time, until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface.
  5. Knead, adding flour a little at a time, until you have a smooth, elastic dough.
  6. Put the dough into an oiled bowl. Turn to coat the entire ball of dough with oil. Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise until doubled, about one hour.
  7. Turn the dough out onto a lightly oiled work surface. Divide in half and roll each half into a 10 by 14-inch rectangle. This removes the excess gases and gives a more uniform texture to the finished loaves. Roll the dough into a 10-inch cylinder, and pinch the loose end to the loaf. Fold the ends of the loaf like a package by bringing each side into the center of the end then bringing the bottom layer of dough to the top and pinching it to the top. Repeat with the other end of the dough and place, pinched-side
  8. down, into well-seasoned loaf pans. With a dough scraper or turning spatula, push down the length of the loaf all the way through to the bottom.
  9. Cover with a towel and let rise for 45 minutes.
  10. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  11. Bake for 40 minutes, or until the internal temperature of the loaves reaches 190 degrees.
  12. Immediately remove from pans and cool on a rack to prevent the crust from becoming soggy.

Recipe Notes

Note: I include gluten flour in the recipe because it is one of the ingredients listed for the packaged bread. However, I generally avoid using this high-protein flour, feeling that a good hard wheat flour and proper kneading contribute to a lofty rise that needs no boost from the gluten flour.

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